2336 cryptocurrencies
Total Market Cap $5,295,884,471,440,459
Total Volume 24h $395,946,099

Hive Hive star

$0.05
0.00000000 (0.00%)

Based in Estonia with roots in Japan, Blockhive creates practical and innovative solutions for businesses in the form of partnership, helping them unlock new markets and untapped opportunities as part of our ambition to create a win-win outcome. Blockhive works with partners to design their blockchain strategy, and jointly develops projects with them. No fees are charged. Instead, revenue from the projects is shared between blockhive and its partners. HIVE is an ERC20 token based on the Ethereum network which give Creditors who provided lending to the company the ability to trade their rights with others.

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How sniffer dogs are helping protect honeybees from decimation

Aug 8th, 2018

Cybil Preston stretches her bare hands into a noisy beehive and pulls out a frame of honeycomb, its waxy cells filled with nectar, its surface alive with bees. "This girl right here was just born," she says, pointing out a bee with a silvery thorax. "See how her hair is still matted down like a teddy bear?" Preston, the chief apiary inspector for the Maryland Department of Agriculture, is on a routine survey of registered colonies northeast of Baltimore. "I'm always looking for signs and signals," she says, as she examines a worker bee with a misshapen wing. "It's like CSI." Honeybees are a vital, invisible workforce in the food industry, pollinating about a third of US crops, and Preston leads a team that tracks their wellbeing. She pays close attention to Maryland's commercial colonies, which beekeepers lease out to work blooms across the country - almonds in California, blueberries in Maine and New Jersey, citrus in Florida. Preston, 45, certifies that each beehive crossing the state line is free of American foulbrood, bacteria that are harmless to humans but can spread quickly from hive to hive, decimating bee populations. "Everything else that can go wrong with the hives is fixable," she says, "but not that." Four years ago, Preston trained a dog to help her find foulbrood, figuring it out as she went along. She recently received a grant through the federal farm bill to expand her canine detection programme, which could serve as a model for other states. Unlike human inspectors, dogs don't need the hives opened up to check them for foulbrood. They can trot by, sniffing at the comb, and tell if the bacteria has killed off any larvae. Four people working full-time cover less than half of what her dog can, Preston says. Her golden Labrador, Mack, inspected about 1,700 honeybee colonies last fall and winter. In the cold, when the bees were clustered and the comb was hard to inspect visually, Mack used his nose. This allowed Preston to continue certifying hives for shipment to warmer climates. "If I didn't have dogs, these bees just wouldn't be able to move," she says. On a recent Friday morning, on the green slopes behind her home in Jarrettsville, Preston tosses a toy around for Tukka, a young springer spaniel she has just adopted. At first glance, it doesn't look like a workday. But that toy has been sealed in a plastic bag with foulbrood, and Preston is in the early stages of training Tukka on the scent. With any luck, he will join her team before the end of the year. "You want Foulbrood Bunny?" she asks, throwing the fuzzy grey toy across the field. Tukka catches the toy in a frenzy, salivating at the smell of it, chewing it with delirious pleasure. "This is what I want to see," Preston says. Soon, she will move on to putting foulbrood inside a small rubber toy and throwing it farther, or in an unexpected direction, to see if Tukka can sniff it out. Then she will hide the scent in the training installation she built exactly for this purpose - tubes mounted close together at various heights on an industrial plastic pallet. If the exercises are successful, Tukka will learn to find even small traces of the scent, and communicate that to Preston by pointing with his nose, then sitting down. She trained Mack the same way, bonding with the dog through games and repetition, building up his confidence and trust, all the while teaching him the basics of his new job. That training took nine months. "I had to learn to trust him," Preston says. Mack was a year and a half old when she found him living in a garage. Preston adopted him on the spot and took him to Mark Flynn, the K-9 unit commander at the state's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, to get his opinion. Flynn trains dogs to associate scents with play. "We're looking for those dogs that'll jump into water to get the ball, the ones completely obsessed with their toys," he says. "Because when a dog is searching, he believes in his heart he's trying to find his toy." This applies whether the dog is looking for contraband cellphones and drugs in prison cells, or foulbrood in beehives. Many of the dogs Flynn trains are adopted through rescue organisations, exhibiting the kind of high-energy behaviour and hunting instincts that make them unlikely to be adopted as family pets but ideal for scent work. *** Mack's drive is low. "But there is this phenomenon where you can actually build up drive in a dog," Flynn says. And through play, reward and repetition, that's just what Preston is doing. She goes home in the middle of her busy workdays to train Tukka, a rescue dog she adopted through Flynn, because Tukka requires sessions at least four times a day. It's a lot of time, but Preston reminds herself that once Tukka is up to speed, he will help her team cover more ground, work faster and more meticulously, and protect more honeybees. The hive of a single healthy colony may hold around 30,000 bees in the late fall, and closer to 20,000 by the end of the winter. This time of year, as the bees gear back up and forage, each hive could be buzzing with up to 60,000 bees. The tractor-trailers that carry hives across the country to pollinate crops are typically moving about seven million bees at a time. They are all vulnerable. Marla Spivak, a professor in the entomology department at the University of Minnesota, has been working for more than a decade to understand why honeybee populations are dwindling. She says it may be a result of environmental stress, weakened genetics, a lack of good nutrition from pollen (which affects bee immune systems) and a host of other reasons that interact with one another. Foulbrood, which has been reported in the US since at least the 1930s, is particularly devastating now because bee health is so fragile. "It's super-complicated," says Spivak, who notes that, paradoxically, as colonies are becoming harder to keep alive through regular management techniques, more amateurs are becoming backyard beekeepers. If someone with even a single hive loses the colony to foulbrood and lets the empty hive sit around, other bees in the area will quickly move in, loot its resources and inadvertently carry the dangerous, spore-laden honey back to feed their larvae. As Preston puts it: "It's in every bee's nature to rob." This makes even one hive a risk. "If there are foulbrood spores in the comb, they stay in the comb for probably a hundred years," Spivak says. "The only solution is to burn the comb and equipment, and that's harsh." Outbreaks are preventable, but beekeepers have to know what they're looking for. "Dogs are great because they can sniff it out at such low levels," Spivak says. But they are also rare in the business, in part because of the investment in training them. She has seen a dog working among hives only once, and that was almost 30 years ago. Maryland has run a canine detection programme since the 1980s. But when Preston took over the department, both the dog handler and his dog retired at the same time. It took almost a year, but she built the programme back up from scratch. "All beekeepers are having trouble keeping their bees alive," she says. "If they're putting the effort in, I want to put the effort in." The hives are quiet when the dogs work, so they're not in danger of stings as they pad around without the veils that protect beekeepers. Mack has been stung only once or twice. And on long summer days, when the hives are busy with bees flying in and out to forage, Mack is cautious. He keeps his distance. "He's a couch potato," Preston says. Just as she is throwing the scent-soaked toy for Tukka, Mack leaps up from his sunny spot in the grass and charges at the other dog full speed, only to delicately lick the Department of Agriculture's newest employee right on his snout. "You're working with another living creature," Preston says. "There's no protocol here. We're all just flying by the seat of our pants."


Feeling the sting of theft, local beekeepers offer reward for information

Aug 2nd, 2018

ST. GEORGE - Area beekeepers are feeling the sting of theft and have come together to offer a reward for information leading to the arrest of whoever is responsible for tampering with their livelihood. Frustrated with continuing instances of theft and vandalism, a group of Southern Utah beekeepers is offering $3,800 to the public to help stop the repeated acts of thievery. "You can't sustain bee business when you have to deal with theft because you'll spend all of you profits to avoid it," beekeeper Casey Lofthouse said. Last week, Lofthouse, who also serves as the Washington County Bee Inspector, posted the $3,800 reward on his Facebook page following the discovery that some of his beehives had been tampered with and parts stolen. The reward is made up of the various amounts Lofthouse and other beekeepers have offered to help find the perpetrator. "Stolen in Southern Utah and Kolob Mtn. Please share and help us find the scum that keeps stealing our livelihood! This has to be someone capable of extracting the honey," Lofthouse wrote. "Several beekeepers have noticed boxes missing here and there 4 or 5 honey supers, mini mating nucs with over 100 queens stolen this spring, misc equipment missing or tampered with. We do have game cameras on many of our yards." When asked how much he may have had stolen, Lofthouse said he wouldn't know for certain until after checking other bee yards which are scattered across the county and beyond that. He and other beekeepers affected by the thefts also maintain bee yards in Iron and Kane counties. This is a part of the problem, Lofthouse said. The beekeepers check on their bee yards once every few weeks, and in between that time someone can come in and steal honey boxes and other items. A beekeeper won't know what's happened until he visits the yard and notices his beehives have been tampered with or are missing. Trail cameras have been set up to monitor some bee yards, Lofthouse said, but those also have limitations of not being checked often enough before their memory cards are full. Remote areas can also lack phone reception, making monitoring the cameras in real time an impossibility. "Microchips and GPS is an option, but many times very expensive in excess of losses you may incur." Lofthouse wrote on Facebook. "If it is on the box and they take individual frames it is of no use. Each hive consists of 10 frames per box and during honey production you could have 4 or 5 boxes deep. How can one afford to mark, track and account for every box and frame when your talking thousand of parts and pieces?" In addition, it can be difficult to track stolen materials because bee-related items are similar from hive to hive. You may have your company name and logo on a beehive and the components inside, and all a thief seems to need to do is paint over them. Lofthouse said police reports to local law enforcement agencies were being made with possibly more on the way with the future inspection of additional bee yards. The Washington County Sheriff's Office and Hurricane City Police said they had not yet recieved any reports of the beekeeper thefts as of Thursday, but had since become aware of the issue. The Sheriff's Office noted they had dealt with beekeeping thefts in the past, but not recently. Any charges related to such a theft would be determined based on the value of the property stolen, the Sheriff's Office said. Lofthouse said a working beehive with honey boxes and a honey crop can net over $700. Each box of honey can also be around 40 pounds. Jared Taylor, incoming president of the Utah Beekeepers Association, said a pound of honey can retail for around $10. Part of the revenue the bees produce also comes through their use as pollinators, he said. Taylor, who's had hives and related items stolen, said it's also frustrating when bee colonies in the hives are destroyed due to mishandling. In some cases, the top of a beehive is removed to take out frames and then left open, exposing the hive to the elements. That results in the death of the hive and it can't be recolonized until the following spring. "When a hive dies out, it can take a full year to get that have back into production," Taylor said. "There's a lot of time invested in there, and time the most valuable thing you don't get back." Thieves look to steal the honey crop and process it themselves for sale or use stolen bees to create a wider population that can be sold to other beekeepers. "Sometimes it's another beekeeper who thinks they have a right to our items," Taylor said. The public may not be aware of just who should be in a bee yard and who shouldn't. "Usually, when you see a beekeeper in a bee yard, you assume he belongs there because he has (a bee suit) on," Taylor said. However, if the public does see something suspicious or that looks out of place in a bee yard, they are encouraged to contact the local police. "As beekeepers we're going to be much more vigilant," Lofthouse said. "It's just a matter of time before we're hit hard again." Lofhouse added, "We're all dedicated to putting the word out that if you find somebody stealing bees, you're going to have money in your hand." Ed. Note: This article has been updated to reflect comments from the Washington County Sheriff's Office and Hurricane City Police Department. Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2018, all rights reserved.


Stocks of Note for Aug-3 Morning - Stock Market News

Aug 4th, 2018

These stocks are making interesting moves on high volume. Elbit Imaging Ltd. (EMITF) < (EMITF) is currently trading at $2.48 + 0.32 (14.81%). Elbit Imaging Ltd. (EMITF) < is +7.83% for the past 30 days, -12.68% year-to-date, and -14.48% over the last 12 months. Elbit Imaging Ltd is an Israel based company provides real estate services. The business activity of the group is operated through Commercial centers, Medical Industries, and Plots in India. NTN Buzztime Inc. (NTN) < (NTN) is currently trading at $4.95 + 0.51 (11.49%). NTN Buzztime Inc. (NTN) < is +6.19% for the past 30 days, +17.58% year-to-date, and -29.29% over the last 12 months. NTN Buzztime Inc provides interactive entertainment and dining technology to bars and restaurants in North America. Its main products are Buzztime, Playmaker, Mobile Playmaker, BEOND Powered by Buzztime and Play Along. TransAct Technologies Incorporated (TACT) < (TACT) is currently trading at $13.26 + 1.36 (11.45%). TransAct Technologies Incorporated (TACT) < is +8.94% for the past 30 days, +0.09% year-to-date, and +54.02% over the last 12 months. Transact Technologies, Inc. is engaged in developing and selling software-driven technology and printing solutions for restaurant, POS automation and banking, casino and gaming, lottery, mobile and oil and gas. Wesco Aircraft Holdings Inc. (WAIR) < (WAIR) is currently trading at $13.30 + 1.35 (11.30%). Wesco Aircraft Holdings Inc. (WAIR) < is +20.00% for the past 30 days, +79.73% year-to-date, and +27.54% over the last 12 months. Wesco Aircraft Holdings Inc distributes & supplies supply chain management services to aerospace industry. It offers services including traditional distribution to the management of supplier relationships, JIT delivery & point-of-use inventory management. Aerohive Networks Inc. (HIVE) < (HIVE) is currently trading at $4.64 + 0.405 (9.57%). Aerohive Networks Inc. (HIVE) < is +13.97% for the past 30 days, -20.50% year-to-date, and +49.04% over the last 12 months. Aerohive Networks Inc designs and develops cloud networking and enterprise wi-fi solutions in Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and the Asia Pacific region. Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage Inc. (NGVC) < (NGVC) is currently trading at $15.62 + 2.17 (16.13%). Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage Inc. (NGVC) < is +25.82% for the past 30 days, +74.92% year-to-date, and +89.18% over the last 12 months. Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage Inc is a specialty retailer of natural, organic groceries and dietary supplements. Oxbridge Re Holdings Limited (OXBR) < (OXBR) is currently trading at $2.45 + 0.70 (40.00%). Oxbridge Re Holdings Limited (OXBR) < is +16.67% for the past 30 days, +13.95% year-to-date, and -62.50% over the last 12 months. Oxbridge Re Holdings Ltd is engaged in providing reinsurance business solutions. The company through its subsidiary offers reinsurance to property and casualty insurers in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc. (MDRX) < (MDRX) is currently trading at $13.75 + 1.15 (9.17%). Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc. (MDRX) < is +14.37% for the past 30 days, -5.53% year-to-date, and +17.99% over the last 12 months. Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc is a provider of clinical, financial, connectivity and information solutions and related professional services that empower hospitals, physicians and post-acute organizations to deliver world-class outcomes. Pixelworks Inc. (PXLW) < (PXLW) is currently trading at $4.38 + 1.12 (34.35%). Pixelworks Inc. (PXLW) < is +25.85% for the past 30 days, -30.81% year-to-date, and -2.55% over the last 12 months. Pixelworks Inc manufactures and sells semiconductor products primarily in Japan. The company's technology provides key essentials for the development of display features in electronic devices such as smartphones and tablets. GoPro Inc. (GPRO) < (GPRO) is currently trading at $6.86 + 0.87 (14.52%). GoPro Inc. (GPRO) < is +5.35% for the past 30 days, -9.38% year-to-date, and -16.59% over the last 12 months. GoPro Inc is a United States-based company engaged in the development and sale of cameras, mountable and wearable accessories and drones. The company has presence, including in the Americas, Europe, Middle East, Africa, and Asia-Pacific. One Stop Systems Inc. (OSS) < (OSS) is currently trading at $3.65 - 0.53 (12.68%). One Stop Systems Inc. (OSS) < is -6.99% for the past 30 days, -- year-to-date, and -- over the last 12 months. One Stop Systems Inc designs, manufactures and markets high-end systems for high performance computing applications. Its products are used by automated equipment used for telecommunications, industrial and military applications. Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. (CPIX) < (CPIX) is currently trading at $5.60 - 0.40 (6.67%). Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. (CPIX) < is -8.79% for the past 30 days, -23.91% year-to-date, and -17.65% over the last 12 months. Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc is a specialty pharmaceutical company. It is engaged in the acquisition, development and commercialization of branded prescription products. Its target markets are hospital acute care and gastroenterology. Aspen Aerogels Inc. (ASPN) < (ASPN) is currently trading at $4.47 - 0.67 (13.04%). Aspen Aerogels Inc. (ASPN) < is -7.64% for the past 30 days, -8.40% year-to-date, and -3.04% over the last 12 months. Aspen Aerogels Inc is an energy technology company that designs, develops and manufactures high-performance aerogel insulation used in energy infrastructure and construction facilities. Oncolytics Biotech Inc. (ONCY) < (ONCY) is currently trading at $4.46 - 0.34 (7.08%). Oncolytics Biotech Inc. (ONCY) < is -15.76% for the past 30 days, -17.36% year-to-date, and +21.44% over the last 12 months. Oncolytics Biotech Inc is a development stage biopharmaceutical company. It is engaged in the discovery and development of pharmaceutical products for the treatment of cancer that have not been successfully treated with conventional therapeutics. Dawson Geophysical Company (DWSN) < (DWSN) is currently trading at $5.86 - 0.50 (7.86%). Dawson Geophysical Company (DWSN) < is -21.26% for the past 30 days, +23.80% year-to-date, and +50.00% over the last 12 months. Dawson Geophysical Co is a provider of seismic data acquisition services throughout the continental United States and Canada. The company acquires geophysical data using the latest in 3-D survey techniques. Heritage Insurance Holdings Inc. (HRTG) < (HRTG) is currently trading at $14.72 - 2.155 (12.77%). Heritage Insurance Holdings Inc. (HRTG) < is -11.60% for the past 30 days, -18.34% year-to-date, and +21.45% over the last 12 months. Heritage Insurance Holdings Inc is a property and casualty insurance holding company. The company provides personal residential insurance for single-family homeowners and condominium owners, rental property insurance and commercial residential insurance. Arbutus Biopharma Corporation (ABUS) < (ABUS) is currently trading at $10.15 - 2.20 (17.81%). Arbutus Biopharma Corporation (ABUS) < is +22.89% for the past 30 days, +100.99% year-to-date, and +200.00% over the last 12 months. Arbutus Biopharma Corp is a biopharmaceutical business engaged in advancing novel RNA interference therapeutics and discovering, developing and commercializing a cure for patients suffering from chronic hepatitis B infection. Titan International Inc. (DE) (TWI) < (TWI) is currently trading at $8.86 - 1.26 (12.45%). Titan International Inc. (DE) (TWI) < is -18.58% for the past 30 days, -31.21% year-to-date, and -17.58% over the last 12 months. Titan International Inc is a manufacturer of wheels, tires, wheel and tire assemblies, and undercarriage systems and components for off-highway vehicles. It operates through three segments namely Agricultural, Earthmoving/Construction, and Consumer. Bristow Group Inc. (BRS) < (BRS) is currently trading at $12.12 - 1.38 (10.22%). Bristow Group Inc. (BRS) < is -10.63% for the past 30 days, -10.02% year-to-date, and +66.62% over the last 12 months. Bristow Group Inc is an industrial aviation services provider. The company is a helicopter service provider to the offshore energy industry with international operations. Immersion Corporation (IMMR) < (IMMR) is currently trading at $10.70 - 3.53 (24.81%). Immersion Corporation (IMMR) < is -29.27% for the past 30 days, +51.56% year-to-date, and +36.74% over the last 12 months. Immersion Corp is a software licensing company. It is engaged in creation, design, development, and licensing of patented haptic technologies that allow people to use their sense of touch more fully when operating digital devices. tags: EMITF, NTN, TACT, WAIR, HIVE, NGVC, OXBR, MDRX, PXLW, GPRO, OSS, CPIX, ASPN, ONCY, DWSN, HRTG, ABUS, TWI, BRS, IMMR


08-03-18 USDA-NASS-MRFO: January 1 Honey Bee Colonies Down Slightly for Operations with Five or More Colonies

Aug 3rd, 2018

Honey bee colonies for operations with five or more colonies in the United States on January 1, 2018 totaled 2.63 million colonies, down slightly from January 1, 2017. The number of colonies in the United States on April 1, 2018 was 2.69 million colonies. During 2017, honey bee colonies on January 1, April 1, July 1, and October 1 were 2.64 million, 2.69 million, 2.99 million, and 2.85 million colonies, respectively. Honey bee colonies lost for operations with five or more colonies from January through March 2018, was 425 thousand colonies, or 16 percent. The number of colonies lost during the quarter of April through June 2018 was 270 thousand colonies, or 10 percent. During the quarter of October through December 2017, colonies lost totaled 425 thousand colonies, or 15 percent, the highest of any quarter in 2017. The quarter in 2017 with the lowest number of colonies lost was April through June, with 286 thousand colonies lost, or 11 percent. Honey bee colonies added for operations with five or more colonies from January through March 2018 was 513 thousand colonies. The number of colonies added during the quarter of April through June 2018 was 726 thousand. During the quarter of April through June 2017, 613 thousand colonies were added, the highest number of honey bee colonies added for any quarter of 2017. The quarter of October through December 2017 added 205 thousand colonies, the least number of honey bee colonies added for any quarter of 2017. Honey bee colonies renovated for operations with five or more colonies from January through March 2018 was 289 thousand colonies, or 11 percent. During the quarter of April through June 2018, 715 thousand colonies, or 27 percent, were renovated. The quarter in 2017 with the highest number of colonies renovated was April through June with 763 thousand colonies renovated, or 28 percent. The quarter in 2017 with the lowest number of colonies renovated was October through December 2017, with 214 thousand or 8 percent. Renovated colonies are those that were requeened or received new honey bees through a nuc or package. Honey bee colonies renovated for operations with five or more colonies from January through March 2018 was 289 thousand colonies, or 11 percent. During the quarter of April through June 2018, 715 thousand colonies, or 27 percent, were renovated. The quarter in 2017 with the highest number of colonies renovated was April through June with 763 thousand colonies renovated, or 28 percent. The quarter in 2017 with the lowest number of colonies renovated was October through December 2017, with 214 thousand or 8 percent. Renovated colonies are those that were requeened or received new honey bees through a nuc or package. Honey bee colonies renovated for operations with five or more colonies from January through March 2018 was 289 thousand colonies, or 11 percent. During the quarter of April through June 2018, 715 thousand colonies, or 27 percent, were renovated. The quarter in 2017 with the highest number of colonies renovated was April through June with 763 thousand colonies renovated, or 28 percent. The quarter in 2017 with the lowest number of colonies renovated was October through December 2017, with 214 thousand or 8 percent. Renovated colonies are those that were requeened or received new honey bees through a nuc or package. Honey bee colonies for operations with less than five colonies in the United States on January 1, 2017 totaled 40.0 thousand down 9 percent from January 1, 2016. During 2017, honey bee colonies on April 1, July 1, and October 1 were 35.0 thousand, 43.0 thousand, and 39.0 thousand, respectively. Honey bee colonies lost for operations with less than five colonies during the quarter of January through March 2017 was 13.5 thousand colonies, the highest number of honey bee colonies lost during any quarter for 2017. The quarter in 2017 with the least number of colonies lost was April through June, with 4.20 thousand colonies. Honey bee colonies added for operations with less than five colonies during the quarter of April through June 2017 was 12.5 thousand colonies, the highest number of honey bee colonies added during any quarter of 2017. The quarter in 2017 with the least number of colonies added was October through December, with 960 colonies. Honey bee colonies renovated for operations with less than five colonies during the quarter of April through June 2017 was 4.40 thousand colonies, the highest number of honey bee colonies renovated during any quarter of 2017. The quarter in 2017 with the least number of colonies renovated was October through December, with 1.10 thousand colonies. During 2017, the highest reported colony stressor was varroa mites, with 26.3 percent of the colonies reported to be affected. This is a 5 percent increase from the previous year. Honey bee colonies lost with Colony Collapse Disorder symptoms on operations with less than five colonies was 6.00 thousand colonies during 2017, a 9 percent increase from 2016. Colonies lost with Colony Collapse Disorder symptoms were reported to meet all of the following criteria: 1) Little to no build-up of dead bees in the hive or at the hive entrance 2) Rapid loss of adult honey bee population despite the presence of queen, capped brood, and food reserves 3) Absence or delayed robbing of the food reserves 4) Loss not attributable to varroa or nosema loads. For a full copy of the Honey Bee Colonies report please visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. For state specific questions please contact:


9 points from Honey Bee Colonies report

Aug 6th, 2018

The number of honey bee colonies for operations with five or more colonies dropped from Jan. 1, 2017, to Jan. 1, 2018, the latest USDA NASS Honey Bee Colonies report shows. On Jan. 1, 2018, there were 2.63 million colonies in the United States, compared to 2.64 million a year earlier. Here's a look a more numbers from the report: On April 1, 2018, there were 2.69 million honey bee colonies in the U.S., which is the same as April 1, 2017. On July 1, 2017, there were 2.99 million colonies and there were 2.85 million colonies on Oct. 1, 2017. From January 2018 through March 2018, 425,000 or 16% of colonies were lost at operations with five or more colonies. The number of colonies lost from April through June 2018 was 270,000, or 10%. From October through December 2017, 15% of colonies, or 425,000 were lost, which was the highest of any quarter in 2017. The 2017 quarter with the lowest number of colonies lost was April through June, with 11% loss, or 286,000 colonies. From January through March 2018, 513,000 colonies were added and during the April through June 2018 quarter, 726,000 colonies were added. During the April through June 2017 quarter, 613,000 colonies were added. From January through March 2018, 289,000 colonies, or 11%, were renovated. During the April through June 2018 quarter, 715,000 colonies, or 27% were renovated. From April through June 2017, 763,000, or 28%, of colonies were renovated. There was a 15% increase from a year earlier in colonies lost with Colony Collapse Disorder symptoms from January through March 2018, with 77.8 thousand colonies lost. Colonies lost with Colony Collapse Disorder meet the following criteria: Little to no buildup of dead bees in the hive or at the hive entrance, rapid loss of adult honey bee population despite the presenece of queen, capped brood and food reserves and absence or delayed robbing of the food reserves and the loss is not attributable to varroa or nosema loads. Varroa mites were the No. 1 stressor for operations with five or more colonies. From January through March 2018, 40.8% of colonies were reported to be affected by varroa mites and from April through June 2018, 53.4% were affected. Source: USDA NASS


Visit website open_in_new
Market share 100.00%
Proof type
24h Open $0.05
24h Low $0.05
24h High $0.05
Price in BTC 0.00001550263173 BTC
Current Supply 99,999,998,430,674,944 HIVE
Market cap $5,295,714,540,191,744
24h Volume (coin) 0 HIVE
24h Volume (currency) $0
Last updated 2018-12-13 04:44:22 +00:00 GMT
ID Market Type Price Quantity Total
Date Price Volume